Archive for the ‘updates’ Category

July 1st 2013 updates

June 30, 2013

Sixteen new citations added on July 1st — see the latest additions page for details.

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updates: litgeog and mapping

May 17, 2013

11 new citations added today to the literary geography and mapping page

Barchas, J. 2009. “Mapping Northanger Abbey: Or, Why Austen’s Bath of 1803 Resembles Joyce’s Dublin of 1904.” The Review of English Studies 60 (245) (June 1): 431–459.

Crawford, R. 2007. “Cartography and the Poetry of Place.” In A Companion to Eighteenth-Century Poetry, edited by Christine Gerrard, 549–562. Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

Ellis, T. 2004. “The Topography of Dalian and the Cartography of Fantastic Asia in Anzai Fuyue’s Poetry.” Comparative Literature Studies 41 (4): 482–500.

Fordoński, K. 2007. “Mapping Europe in Verse. Poetic Cartography of Seamus Heaney.” Kwartalnik Neofilologiczny, LIV (3), 280-287.

Gunn, R. 2012. “John Russell Bartlett’s Literary Borderlands: Ethnology, War, and the United States Boundary Survey.” Western American Literature 46 (4): 348–380.

Lee, D. 1997. “Mapping the Interior: African Cartography and Shelley’s the Witch of Atlas.” European Romantic Review 8 (2): 169–184. .O’Brien, P. 1999. The Wake Forest Book of Irish Women’s Poetry, 1967-2000. Wake Forest Univ Pr.

Padrón, R. 2004. The Spacious Word: Cartography, Literature, and Empire in Early Modern Spain. University of Chicago Press.

Pedri, N. 2008. “Cartographic Explorations of Self in Michael Ondaatje’s Running in the Family and Jacques Poulin’s Volkswagen Blues.” International Journal of Canadian Studies (38): 41.

Piper, K. L. 2002. Cartographic Fictions: Maps, Race, and Identity. Rutgers University Press.

Riley, J. E. 2009. “Eavan Boland’s‘ The Lost Land’: Altering the Cartography of the Irish Poem.” The Canadian Journal of Irish Studies: 61–66.

Yan, S. 2013. “Mapping Knowledge and Power: Cartographic Representations of Empire in Victorian Britain.” online.

updates: fiction & poetry

March 16, 2013

Five new citations added today   —

• Genoni, P. 2012. “The Sydney Harbour Bridge: From Modernity to Post-modernity in Australian Fiction.” Journal of the Association for the Study of Australian Literature 12 (1) (July 16).

This paper considers a recent spate of novels that deal in various ways with the construction of the Sydney Harbour Bridge. These include Peter Corris’s Wet Graves; Alex Miller’s Conditions of Faith; Vicki Hastrich’s The Great Arch; and Sarah Hay’s The Body in the Clouds. It is argued that these novels, written so long after the bridge’s completion, are each grappling with the transformation of this icon of Australian modernism into the significant component in the nation’s foremost experience of postmoadern urban space – Circular Quay.

• Hansen, J. 2012. “Space, Time, and Plane Travel in Walter Kirn’s Novel Up in the Air.” Nordic Journal of English Studies 11 (3): 18–35.

This article applies Mikhail Bakhtin’s concept of the literary chronotope to an analysis of the depiction of corporate air travel in Walter Kirn’s novel Up in the Air (2001). The analysis shows how the novel positions itself in relation to the genre of road narratives, at the same time transforming it by exchanging the car and the road for airplanes and airports. It further examines how the “airworld” chronotope is characterized by a disjunction between space and time. This contributes to a critique of commercialization and reification of space and time in contemporary American society, and also serves to question ideals traditionally associated with the American road genre.

• Mathieson, C. 2012. “‘a Moving and a Moving on’: Mobility, Space, and the Nation in Charles Dickens’s Bleak House.” English 61 (235) (December 1): 395–405.

This article argues that despite apparently being the most ‘national’ of his novels, Bleak House is actively engaged with mid-nineteenth-century global travel culture and that reading the text through its mobile structures offers a productive framework through which to reconsider the novel’s nation-building practices. It explores the relationship between space, mobility, and social relations in the novel, reading Dickens’s employment of mobile structures in the text as evidence of a deep anxiety about the preserve of national place in an era of global modernity and revealing the impossibility of denying Britain’s inextricable connection to the modern world.

• McCulloch, A. 2013. “A.D. Hope: Nomad of the Mind, Land and Space.” Journal of the Association for the Study of Australian Literature: 81–87.

The paper will be inter-disciplinary in nature in that it attempts to collapse the divides between biography, philosophy, aesthetics, poetry and psychology. I will draw on three Hope poems that invoke Australian landscape, and which enact a unique creative identity with the land. Characterising Hope as having a nomadic subjectivity which is defined by its dynamism, by its becoming, by its variability of continuous and open modification, I wish to draw attention to the extent that Hope’s work pre-empts contemporary theory.

• Wilhite, K. 2012. “Contested Terrain: The Suburbs as Region.” American Literature 84 (3) (September 1): 617–644.

Wilhite contends that a general indebtedness to Cold War cultural critique has kept literary scholars from reading the suburbs and suburban fiction for what they truly are: the endgame and final outpost of US regionalism. Drawing on discussions of regional writing and cultural geography, Wilhite argues that we should read suburban narratives for the ways they update and revise long-standing regionalist approaches to local and global concerns: the charged insularity of the domestic sphere, the geographic containment of racial difference, the repressive construction of a common national identity, and the imperial reach of nation. As a mode of geopolitical analysis, regionalism clarifies the fraught relationship between isolationism and imperialism that has shaped US residential geography. When read as form of regional writing, suburban fiction exposes our homes and neighborhoods as national and transnational “sites of contestation.” To develop this line of thinking, Wilhite offers Jonathan Franzen’s The Corrections (2001) and Chang-rae Lee’s Aloft (2004) as case studies for his broader claims about region and the spatial effects of residential sprawl and suburban domesticity. Franzen and Lee both locate the political subject within the competing ideologies of privatism and globalization, but they produce radically different responses to the suburb as a symptomatic fact of twenty-first-century life in the United States. Taken together, these novels offer divergent paths for understanding the suburbs as a uniquely problematic and potentially transformative cultural and geographic region.

updates: litgeog: sf/fantasy

March 9, 2013

Five new citations added today to the literary geography: sf/fantasy page —

Abbott, C. 2012. “Rocky Mountain Refuge: Constructing ‘Colorado’ in Science Fiction.” 2012. Science Fiction Studies 39 (2) (July): 221–242.

Carroll, S. 2012. “Imagined Nation.” Extrapolation 53 (3) (January 1): 307–326.

• “This essay analyzes the representation of place and its relationship to personal and national identity in Neil Gaiman’s American Gods.”

Curry, A. 2012. “‘The Pale Trees Shook, Although No Wind Blew, and It Seemed to Tristran That They Shook in Anger’: ‘blind Space’ and Ecofeminism in a Post-colonial Reading of Neil Gaiman and Charles Vess’s Graphic Novel Stardust (1998).” Barnboken – Journal of Children’s Literature Research 33 (2) (May 15).

Ekman, S. 2013. Here Be Dragons: Exploring Fantasy Maps and Settings. Wesleyan University Press.

• “Stefan Ekman provides a wide-ranging survey of the ubiquitous fantasy map as the point of departure for an in-depth discussion of what such maps can tell us about what is important in the fictional worlds and the stories that take place there.”

Vint, S. 2012. “Orange County: Global Networks in Tropic of Orange.” Science Fiction Studies 39 (3) (November): 401–414.

updates: litgeog & tourism

March 9, 2013

Seven new citations added today to the literary geography and tourism page —

Amoamo, Maria. 2013. “(de)Constructing Place-Myth: Pitcairn Island and the ‘Bounty’ Story.” Tourism Geographies 15 (1): 107–124.

Dolin, Tim. 2012. “Who Belongs Where in The Woodlanders?” Modern Language Quarterly 73 (4) (December 1): 545–568.

Hawkes, L. 2012. “Walking the Coleridge Way :  Using Cultural Tourism to Change Perceptions of Somerset After the Foot and Mouth Epidemic of 2001”. Journal Article. Social Alternatives.

Lee, C. 2012. “‘Have Magic, Will Travel’: Tourism and Harry Potter’s United (Magical) Kingdom.” Tourist Studies 12 (1) (April 1): 52–69.

Light, D. 2012. The Dracula Dilemma: Tourism, Identity and the State in Romania. Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

Peraldo, E. 2012. “Narrative Cartography in the Eighteenth Century: Defoe’s Exploration of Great Britain in the Tour.” Narratives of Travel and Tourism: 97.

Sanders, J. 2012. “Stratfordian Perambulations; or, Walking with Shakespeare.” Critical Survey 24 (2): 39–53.

February 24th 2013: updates

February 24, 2013

There is a now a new page listing citations published in 2013. The page that was “2012-present” is now “2010-2012.”

As ever, check the ! latest additions ! page for new citations.

Follow us on twitter @literarygeogs — !

January 6th 2013: updates

January 6, 2013

See the ! latest additions ! page for a handful of new citations.

There are now 874 citations on the English language list and 111 on the French language list. We’re still hoping to hit 1,000 total by our first anniversary at the end of February, so please contact us if you have suggestions.

We’re now on Twitter as well as facebook — Literary Geographies @literarygeogs

As ever, we welcome news items (calls for papers, conferences, works-in-progress, websites, research projects, etc) as well as contributions, suggestions, corrections, and offers of help, particularly with bibliographies in languages other than English.

November 24th 2012: updates

November 24, 2012

See the ! latest additions ! page for the 30+ new citations added in the past month. We now have a total of 973 citations — hoping to reach 1,000 before the end of the year. . . . .

We’re also now on Twitter — Literary Geographies @literarygeogs

As ever, we welcome news items (calls for papers, conferences, works-in-progress, websites, research projects, etc) as well as contributions, suggestions, corrections, and offers of help, particularly with bibliographies in languages other than English.

October 20th 2012: updates

October 20, 2012

See the ! latest additions ! page for the 50+ new citations added in the past 3 months. Also, take a look at the newly added bibliography of work in French contributed by Marc Brosseau and Pierre-Mathieu Le Bel.

As ever, we welcome news items (calls for papers, conferences, works-in-progress, websites, research projects, etc) as well as contributions, suggestions, corrections, and offers of help, particularly with bibliographies in languages other than English.

July 20th 2012: updates

July 20, 2012

The website has now logged nearly 5,000 page views, from ISPs based in more than 60 countries. Today we’re adding a page showing citations added since April 4th – July 20th (divided into two sections, (1) June 19th-July 20th and (2) April 4-June 19th). These are listed on the page ! latest additions !

As ever, we welcome news items (calls for papers, conferences, works-in-progress, websites, research projects, etc) as well as contributions, suggestions, corrections, and offers of help, particularly with bibliographies in languages other than English.